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Thanks for the Lack of Good Memories, Bud. - Sauce1977 [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Sauce1977

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Thanks for the Lack of Good Memories, Bud. [Oct. 26th, 2006|03:45 am]
Sauce1977
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[Current Location |Warbunker, MI]
[In the Moment |Tired]



Ratings for Games 1 and 2 of the 2006 World Series Reached All-Time Low.

Game 3 Makes a 9.9 Average, Still an All-Time Low.

Mr. Stark, I was incorrect on my guarantee.

However, discovery of record lows for television ratings during this World Series lends my wandering mind a better idea.

This idea stems in part from my previous post and this post about cheating.

I assumed that controversy sells. In general, it tends to sell. No, I'm not talking about Paul Wall & Chamillionaire.

Barry Bonds. Mark McGwire. Sammy Sosa. Rafael Palmeiro. Jose Canseco. Jason Giambi. Ken Caminiti.

Shawne Merriman. Shaun Rogers. Sammy Morris. Matt Lehr.

The last four names are actually NFL players suspended because of positive test for steroids in 2006. The first two players, Merriman and Rogers, are regarded near or at the top of their respective positions in terms of skill.

This does not include Koren Robinson, the NFL wide receiver suspended one year for repeat offense related to substance abuse. Other players in the NFL, from stars to bench warmers, have been suspended for reasons such as steroids, drugs, and conduct. The reaction from fans is often very minimal in comparison.

"Dirtgate" certainly collected a unanimous mushroom cloud in the sports media. Yet, there was no significant jump in ratings for Game 3 of the 2006 World Series, and the low ratings appear on the heels of the previous World Series record for lowest ratings. The 2005 World Series reached an all-time low for television ratings. One year later, a new record low threatens to set.

Reports of a Kenny Rogers "Dirtgate" might register to many as another reason why the person shouldn't watch.

Baseball's greatest headlines generally tend not to be about the game. There are too many distractions in the sport. Overall, for sports fans, there is a gigantic lack of trust in Major League Baseball.

There is also plenty of discussion one can generate on what to do. There are many factors, and debates on lack of trust, steroids, distractions, and everything that is wrong can take many days and many discussions to sort.

Most of the time, however, it's not worth the calories spent moving your fingers across the keyboard.

Major League Baseball is a sport in terminal illness.

It won't die immediately.

It will, however, continue to languish.

Many of the reasons why people feel the MLB is a waste of time begin with the commissioner.

As for my personal interest at this time in the MLB, that centers around my promise. My heart remains broken. I loved this sport, and I understand it as well or better than many of the professional players. I briefly considered an increase in my interest. I quickly decided on Monday that such an idea was absurd.

Every time baseball gets itself in a position to win more appeal, something happens. It's a constant Charlie Brown situation. Lucy is always there in some form to yoink the football and watch ol' Charlie whiff on air and end up on his back.

On Sunday, I tuned in to watch a group of lovable Tigers, a team that had camaraderie, gratitude, and a solid pitching staff. They squared off against the St. Louis Cardinals, a team I also enjoyed from a distance as a child.

By Monday, I watched the endless stream of "Dirtgate" and watched as the Tigers were utterly pushed into the media meat grinder for an incident that probably could be described as a practice quietly used by members on every pitching staff in the MLB. It was blown way out of proportion.

This happens all the time in this professional league. It's nothing new.

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