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Oscars: Didn't Watch. - Sauce1977 [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Sauce1977

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Oscars: Didn't Watch. [Feb. 23rd, 2009|11:47 am]
Sauce1977
[Current Location |Detroit, MI, USA]


Congrats to the winners, and congrats to the nominees, as I am sure they are all very worthy of inclusion.

Unfortunately, I found other events more pressing. I caught up on the news this morning, and I feel that I didn't miss a thing. I objected to perceived 'errors,' which was in part the reason for my disinterest.

Clint Eastwood's Gran Torino snub was conspicuous. If it is retaliation for his support of John McCain, then shame on the Academy. They aren't talking, so there's clearly something wrong.

Also conspicuous was the exclusion of The Dark Knight among nods for Best Picture. That film was a rare high-quality story that met timeless acting and overwhelming satisfaction from the moviegoers. Yet, it doesn't get even a nod among the crop? Who are you kidding, Hollywood? This was a ridiculously more subjective process you conducted, this year. Granted, mistakes are linked forever with humanity. However, for what was supposed to be an objective awards ceremony, after reading several articles, this year's Academy mistakes felt without a spirit of objectivity.

Anonymous executives let it be known that they get the Academy's message, but they are not planning on making films with 'Oscars' in mind. If that was a message to Big Studio America, then it failed, mightily.

From the NY Times article:

But the academy gave no points for popularity. And the company folks noticed.

Some executives, speaking on condition of anonymity to protect their relationships with those who vote for prizes, have said in the last few weeks that they do not expect their studios to make any movie in the foreseeable future as a specific Oscar bet.

If honors happen to come, as they came to “The Departed,” a Warner film that was a surprise best-picture winner in 2007, so be it. But few are looking to make the next “Frost/Nixon,” a smart, critically acclaimed film that got Ron Howard a nomination as best director this year.

“Frost/Nixon” has taken in less than $20 million at the domestic box office, and may not make a profit when the cost of its long Oscar-season promotional campaign is added to its relatively modest $25 million budget.

I was happy that Slumdog Millionaire won heftily, but I wish the Academy could have removed themselves from the process. The whole process felt too insular, and as a result, the Academy's awards felt like a failure. That's not fair to the award-winners or the others who were deserving. Getting too political ... it's a nasty game.
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