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Thank You for Oodishon/Audition. - Sauce1977 [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Sauce1977

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Thank You for Oodishon/Audition. [Mar. 31st, 2004|01:45 am]
Sauce1977
[In the Moment |impressedimpressed]
[Special Music |Towa Tei - Technova (La Em Copacabana)]

Stunning.

Disturbing.

Amazing.

Some may say this film lacks in terms of slow-paced drag-footedness. I disagree, as I did when folks mentioned that 28 Days Later was too slow.

Asami Yamazaki's audition foreshadowed the downward turn of events. If my understanding of Asian culture in respect to the color white is correct, then Asami's choice of dress for the interview . . . illness and death . . . quite truthful.

This tale depicts the clever and patient suspense that so few production crews produce with regards to horror genre.

Those who crave a constant terror-festival, a fast-paced bodies-per-minute, forget I mentioned this film.

Such films are fine every now and then.

This film is a great achievement all of the time.

The dream sequences painted the rest of the assumptions about the mystery of Asami.

Some of the sequences were flashback. I point to the scenes in the restaurants. Her mentionings of abuse as a child should have been less a deeper warning flag to Shigeharu Aoyama . . . the largest warnings should have come from all of her references pointing to dark mystery.

Surely, Shigeharu does not fall completely from blame. He did stage the casting with his friend. The dishonesty, however, is forgiven by the audience with Shigeharu's formal and respectful good nature. A classic tale of a lonely widower who falls into a trap from his trust, fueled further by loneliness . . . prying deeper into a shocking end.

This film gives the audience a perfect, patient creepy ride into the psychotic arms of classic suspense and horror.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: cutedestruction
2004-03-31 04:42 am (UTC)
Now that I've gotten over the more disgusting parts of the film (I don't take throwing up very well, even if it IS fake), I've found that I REALLY liked it. Not many horror movies have such a great build to the horror.
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[User Picture]From: sauce1977
2004-03-31 01:58 pm (UTC)
Excellent foreshadowing helps Audtion/Oodishon build right up to the chilling end.

I loved how the father was such a likeable guy. That helped the audience feel sorry for him.

Vomit-on-camera is kind of disturbing. I think, if done in a realistic way, for whatever reason, it squeams me a little stronger than murder! :D

Odd-aside, I don't like closeups of gore. Nor do I like closeups of needles, nor do I particularly relish closeups of vomit-action.
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[User Picture]From: mostlie_sunnie
2004-03-31 05:11 am (UTC)
We have that, but we haven't watched it yet... I'm kind of afraid to, as I don't handle disturbing movies very well.
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[User Picture]From: sauce1977
2004-03-31 01:01 pm (UTC)
If I were you, by that, I wouldn't watch it.

However, I say in my defense (man who watches anything) that I have a direct understanding that the terror I see on screen is only fictional and therefore not in my midst.

If in reality, I were to see such horrid events, I would most certainly be upset. I become nervous when I have minor confrontation in my life (Apartment Note Post, Comcast Rep Post).
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[User Picture]From: mostlie_sunnie
2004-03-31 01:11 pm (UTC)
I wish my dumb ol' brain could differentiate... I bet I'm missing a lot of good movies because of this.
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[User Picture]From: sauce1977
2004-03-31 01:37 pm (UTC)
Your brain isn't dumb!

My Heidi can't watch this kind of stuff.

Many people are affected by disturbing images on film.

The first time I saw Toxic Avenger as a child, the head-crush scene made me turn off the film in a wave of distress and nausea.

I wouldn't completely argue desensitization, however . . . as I become unnerved at non-violent conflict in reality.

I think it's a careful balance. Knowing 'why' violence happened helps to make it less traumatic. Movies generally do a decent job at letting you know what's up . . .
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[User Picture]From: renazle_dazzle
2004-03-31 06:43 am (UTC)
I am glad you liked it. I love when my recomendations work out. :) I still remember the first time I saw it. I did not expect it to be THAT crazy.
My friend Travis likes to debate that movie. I say that Asami really did what she did. But travis thinks Asami's little outburst was a dream sequence because Shigeharu wakes up in bed with her then closes his eyes and is "Back in the Dream"
I disagree. He is clearly just trying to go to a "happy place" But everything is too intense, so back he go's to endure all that pain.
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[User Picture]From: sauce1977
2004-03-31 01:06 pm (UTC)
I would argue it on your side.

There seems nothing unreal about the scenes in his home. We see Gang, slaughtered, in the other room.

We see the foreshadowing of this when the intruder walks toward the booze bottle.

We see that effect of what was in the bottle after Shigeharu has his nightcap.
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[User Picture]From: renazle_dazzle
2004-03-31 03:54 pm (UTC)
My friend is saying that Asami going sadist on him was part of his "Dream sequence"
He says that when he wakes up in the hotel alone is when this Dream sequence begins. And then it ends when he wakes up with her and he falls asleep and the torture dream continues.

I believe I am right though. She really was a psycho, and she really killed Gang and tortured him etc etc.
The only part that is weird is when her neck looks broke and she is talking to him(after his son knocks her down), it makes me reconsider the argument but then I realize "nah I am right."
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[User Picture]From: sauce1977
2004-03-31 05:06 pm (UTC)
People do extraordinary things.

It is possible to have one's neck broken and survive.

It could be a return-to-dream sequence, but I would prefer a mixture of flashback and dream to reality over a return-to-dream . . . by the sequence of the events of the end of the film.
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